Obama Care Not Enough

January 21, 2016

 Rutland Herlad

Paul Krugman’s “Health reform realities” (Jan. 19) claims that reality limits us to working with Obamacare; a national health care plan like the one Bernie Sanders proposes is unrealistic. But Krugman’s assessment leaves out one extremely important reality and understates a second.

He left out the reality that his approach is a surrender to the power of the health insurance industry that, as he says, “played a major part in killing health reform in the early 1990s.” As he also says, Obamacare was specifically designed to rely on private insurance to keep those insurers from killing it. Now Krugman recommends walking away from a national health care system that even he acknowledges is both better and less expensive than Obamacare, again in deference to the insurance industry’s desires. Allowing the insurance industry to control our lives and our health is not practicality, it is an abandonment of our rights in a democracy and it is a very big mistake.

Krugman also understates the problems that Obamacare is causing out here in “reality.” Expanding Medicaid has helped the poorest of us get some care, but that program’s low reimbursement rates mean that many doctors decline to treat Medicaid patients. The doctors who do take Medicaid are swamped by the newly Medicaid eligible and may lose money treating them.
For many people who buy insurance policies through the exchange, massive deductibles must be paid before the insurer pays anything. Doctors across the country have noted the increase in the number of “insured” patients who are having serious problems figuring out how to both eat and pay their deductibles. Krugman wrongly says that “access to health insurance for all Americans” has been the goal. It’s access to health care — not to insurance — that matters. Obamacare too often fails to achieve it.

LEE RUSS
Bennington